Music in the Civil War

General Lee said that you can’t have an army without music. It was what kept men going through the hard winters in camp and helped to raise the morale of the men. Here are few videos of some songs I think illustrate this point

Published in: on September 19, 2009 at 2:40 pm  Comments Off on Music in the Civil War  

Christianity

I think this really describes the christians both North and South during the War. This is part of Lincoln’s Second inaugural Address

Each looked for an easier triumph, and a result less fundamental and astounding. Both read the same Bible and pray to the same God, and each invokes His aid against the other. It may seem strange that any men should dare to ask a just God’s assistance in wringing their bread from the sweat of other men’s faces, but let us judge not, that we be not judged. The prayers of both could not be answered. That of neither has been answered fully. The Almighty has His own purposes. “Woe unto the world because of offenses; for it must needs be that offenses come, but woe to that man by whom the offense cometh.” If we shall suppose that American slavery is one of those offenses which, in the providence of God, must needs come, but which, having continued through His appointed time, He now wills to remove, and that He gives to both North and South this terrible war as the woe due to those by whom the offense came, shall we discern therein any departure from those divine attributes which the believers in a living God always ascribe to Him? Fondly do we hope, fervently do we pray, that this mighty scourge of war may speedily pass away. Yet, if God wills that it continue until all the wealth piled by the bondsman’s two hundred and fifty years of unrequited toil shall be sunk, and until every drop of blood drawn with the lash shall be paid by another drawn with the sword, as was said three thousand years ago, so still it must be said “the judgments of the Lord are true and righteous altogether.”

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  With malice toward none, with charity for all, with firmness in the right as God gives us to see the right, let us strive on to finish the work we are in, to bind up the nation’s wounds, to care for him who shall have borne the battle and for his widow and his orphan, to do all which may achieve and cherish a just and lasting peace among ourselves and with all nations.

Published in: on September 17, 2009 at 12:11 am  Comments (4)  

Turning Points For America

Well Yesterday was 9/11. So I will post on that topic.

It was a Friday 8 years ago that the face of terrorism and America were changed, by two planes, that were hijacked by the terrorist. It was a turning  point for America just as the battles of Gettysburg and Vicksburg where major turning points for the Army of the United States during Civil War.

Published in: on September 12, 2009 at 10:38 pm  Comments Off on Turning Points For America  

The A B C’s of the Civil War

G is for Gettysburg

Gettysburg-Casualties

Gettysburg was the blodiest three days in the Civil War. It was also a major turning point for the Army of the Potomac.

H is for Herman Haupt

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Herman Haupt was a Union General who greatly revolutionized the movement of troops and supplies via the railroad system.

 

I is for Insurrection

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John Brown attempted to start an insurrection among the slaves but, his plans were foiled by the U.S. Army.

Published in: on September 6, 2009 at 9:15 pm  Comments Off on The A B C’s of the Civil War  

School

Well, blog readers I hate to say this but my school year has started so I will only be posting very occasionally

Published in: on September 4, 2009 at 9:26 pm  Comments (2)  

A B C’s Of the Civil War

D is for Dahlgren Gun

The Dahlgren gun was mainly a navy gun it was a breech loading gun.  The man in the picture is John Dahlgren the inventor of the Dahlgren gun.

E is for Eward Alexander Porter

Edward Porter was the man in charge of the enourmas arttilery barrage just before Picketts Charge at Gettysburg.

F is for Field Hospital

This Field hospital was outside of  Richmond.Field hospitals were where the wounded would be transported during a battle or before they could be transfered to a more permanent hospital.

Published in: on September 1, 2009 at 6:12 pm  Comments Off on A B C’s Of the Civil War